Strengthening our bond to improve animals' lives

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 20 total)
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  • in reply to: Puppy killing littermate #13924
    John Ciribassi
    John Ciribassi
    Keymaster

    Those wounds are consistent with an obvious kill response. It is likely that this problem will persist in this dog. There is no reason to believe that the behavior will extend to people but the risk of future similar incidents with other dogs is high. The two choices in my mind is placing the dog in a situation that assures no unsupervised contact with other dogs, dog is always on leash when other dogs are present, and work with conditioning alternate responses (redirecting to behaviors such as hand targeting and responding to name) when on leash around other dogs. The second choice is euthanasia, which is the only way to guarantee that this will not happen again.

    John Ciribassi DVM, DACVB
    Chicagoland Veterinary Behavior Consultants
    Carol Stream, IL 60188
    drjdvm@gmail.com
    www.chicagovetbehavior.com

  • in reply to: Membership Question for the Board #12127
    John Ciribassi
    John Ciribassi
    Keymaster

    The issue is that AVSAB is not a certifying entity so having a “certificate” up can give a false indication of competence. This is why we do not issue them.

     

    John

    John Ciribassi DVM, DACVB
    Chicagoland Veterinary Behavior Consultants
    Carol Stream, IL 60188
    drjdvm@gmail.com
    www.chicagovetbehavior.com

  • John Ciribassi
    John Ciribassi
    Keymaster

    3 or 4 years ago ACVB (the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists) took over control of the behavior symposium associated with AVMA convention. AVSAB had to make a decision on how to proceed. We suggested to ACVB to enlarge the symposium with AVSAB running a clinical part of the meeting and ACVB doing the lectures. They declined. They now solely operate the Veterinary Behavior Symposium (VBS) which occurs prior to the start of the AVMA Conference.

    So, we had no choice but to strike out on our own. We began what has proved to be a very successful association with the Society of Veterinary Behavior Technicians to run a joint 3 day conference in Las Vegas which combines didactic lectures along with wet labs. This year will be a third year of doing this and we have drawn between 100-125 attendees.

    The conference this year is December 1-3 at the Oquendo Center in Las Vegas and details can be found on the conference web site.  Registration will open sometime in August but the slate of speakers and topics have been set and we have been lucky enough to have a great group of sponsors come on board to help the conference grow. Hope to see you there.

    John Ciribassi

    John Ciribassi DVM, DACVB
    Chicagoland Veterinary Behavior Consultants
    Carol Stream, IL 60188
    drjdvm@gmail.com
    www.chicagovetbehavior.com

  • in reply to: Promote Dittowearables? #11727
    John Ciribassi
    John Ciribassi
    Keymaster

    I don’t think we, as an organization, are doing product reviews or promotions. And, “vibration” is not a method of reinforcement. I would suggest respectfully declining.

    John

    John Ciribassi DVM, DACVB
    Chicagoland Veterinary Behavior Consultants
    Carol Stream, IL 60188
    drjdvm@gmail.com
    www.chicagovetbehavior.com

  • in reply to: Behavior Professional Needed for Client #11389
    John Ciribassi
    John Ciribassi
    Keymaster

    There are three options for veterinary behaviorists in Florida:

    Dr. Lisa Radosta: http://www.flvetbehavior.com/  (Florida Veterinary Behavior Services)

    Dr. Terry Curtis and the University of Florida (Gainesville)   http://www.vetmed.ufl.edu/about-the-college/faculty-directory/terry-curtis/

    Dr. Soraya Juarbe-Diaz   http://www.avsspecialists.com/doctor/soraya-juarbe-diaz/  Affiliated Veterinary Specialists

    Hope that helps.

    Dr. John Ciribassi

    John Ciribassi DVM, DACVB
    Chicagoland Veterinary Behavior Consultants
    Carol Stream, IL 60188
    drjdvm@gmail.com
    www.chicagovetbehavior.com

  • in reply to: Another Client Request – Tennesee #11388
    John Ciribassi
    John Ciribassi
    Keymaster

    There is a veterinary behavior program at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. The veterinarian there is Dr. Julie Albright. Here is the URL for the service:

    https://vetmed.tennessee.edu/vmc/SmallAnimalHospital/AnimalBehavior/Pages/default.aspx

    Dr. John Ciribassi

    John Ciribassi DVM, DACVB
    Chicagoland Veterinary Behavior Consultants
    Carol Stream, IL 60188
    drjdvm@gmail.com
    www.chicagovetbehavior.com

  • in reply to: Board Discussion/Decision on Walk Your Dog Harness #11374
    John Ciribassi
    John Ciribassi
    Keymaster

    If it is easy enough to poste this on the web site for members, then I don’t see a down side to offering this.

    John

    John Ciribassi DVM, DACVB
    Chicagoland Veterinary Behavior Consultants
    Carol Stream, IL 60188
    drjdvm@gmail.com
    www.chicagovetbehavior.com

  • John Ciribassi
    John Ciribassi
    Keymaster

    Mounting is a non-specific behavior, meaning that there a few possible reasons for its occurrence. Anxiety, unfocused activity, attempts to establish relationships and sexual. If you are seeing both dogs attempting to mount, they are not overly worked up, and there is no escalation of aggressive behavior, I would allow them to interact to see if it helps work out their relationship with each other. If it persists, especially if it is one of the dogs pushing the other and the other dog is getting annoyed, then I would suspect an anxiety driven behavior and this can result in escalating aggression. I would then interrupt and redirect the dog that is mounting. If this commonly occurs after a period of prolonged physical activity, you might want to get in the habit of doing some simple, basic obedience exercises as an attempt to wind them down a bit emotionally after an active play session.

    John

    John Ciribassi DVM, DACVB
    Chicagoland Veterinary Behavior Consultants
    Carol Stream, IL 60188
    drjdvm@gmail.com
    www.chicagovetbehavior.com

  • in reply to: Vote on Melanie Cerone, PhD #11272
    John Ciribassi
    John Ciribassi
    Keymaster

    I would suggest responding to her that her credentials are extremely impressive, but she fails to meet the criteria for membership due to the lack of a PhD in an animal behavior related field. If she can pass the certification for ABS, she should reapply. That seems to respect her abilities while adhering to the C and B I think.

    John

    John Ciribassi DVM, DACVB
    Chicagoland Veterinary Behavior Consultants
    Carol Stream, IL 60188
    drjdvm@gmail.com
    www.chicagovetbehavior.com

  • John Ciribassi
    John Ciribassi
    Keymaster

    Matt

    This is a tough one in my experience. It seems as though the personalities of the individuals involved trump the method of exposure. They either co-exist or they don’t. Also, co-existence can take some time to be achieved. We had a 1 1/2 year old Boxer several years ago and added a 1 1/2 year old cat to the household. The dog play bowed, the cat thought that meant stalking and swatted at the dog. The dog thought the cat was signaling play back and things escalated.

    We managed it by providing escape routes for the cat (elevated areas, gates across openings with a small space underneath for the cat to get through, prop open doors a small crack, etc). It took a couple years of gradually decreasing interactions but eventually they learned each other’s language and they grew to become best friends. Keeping them separate is a problem because I think what we get is that the dog essentially wants something more when they can’t have it. Frustration builds and it builds fear in the cat. No chance for a relationship to develop.

    Do, that just are my thoughts. Anxious to hear what other opinions are on this as well.

    John Ciribassi

    John Ciribassi DVM, DACVB
    Chicagoland Veterinary Behavior Consultants
    Carol Stream, IL 60188
    drjdvm@gmail.com
    www.chicagovetbehavior.com

  • in reply to: Vote on Melanie Cerone, PhD #11112
    John Ciribassi
    John Ciribassi
    Keymaster

    What if we respond to her and state that at the time that she achieves CAAB certification she can reapply for membership. Explain that our bylaws require a PhD in animal behavior but if approved as a PhD CAAB this would likely qualify her for membership. If the ABS accepts her PhD and admits and certifies her as a CAAB then this should qualify her as a member of AVSAB.

    John

    John Ciribassi DVM, DACVB
    Chicagoland Veterinary Behavior Consultants
    Carol Stream, IL 60188
    drjdvm@gmail.com
    www.chicagovetbehavior.com

  • John Ciribassi
    John Ciribassi
    Keymaster

    Absolutely Carolyn.

     

    John

    John Ciribassi DVM, DACVB
    Chicagoland Veterinary Behavior Consultants
    Carol Stream, IL 60188
    drjdvm@gmail.com
    www.chicagovetbehavior.com

  • in reply to: Vote on Melanie Cerone, PhD #11087
    John Ciribassi
    John Ciribassi
    Keymaster

    Bottom line is that I would vote yes for her but we need to be aware that technically she does not qualify. By laws say that she need to have a PhD in an animal behavior related field..which she does not. However, she has a ton of background subsequent to this PhD that I think makes her an excellent member. So, combining her backgound and graduate education, I vote Yes.

    John Ciribassi DVM, DACVB
    Chicagoland Veterinary Behavior Consultants
    Carol Stream, IL 60188
    drjdvm@gmail.com
    www.chicagovetbehavior.com

  • in reply to: Question on Member Discount Offer from Sharon Madere #11036
    John Ciribassi
    John Ciribassi
    Keymaster

    I would think adding this to the member’s benefits page would be good and then to put it up temporarily on the home page should be fine. I would not leave on the home page for an extended time since it may set a bad precedent. You could also send a note about it on Mail Chimp.

    John

    John Ciribassi DVM, DACVB
    Chicagoland Veterinary Behavior Consultants
    Carol Stream, IL 60188
    drjdvm@gmail.com
    www.chicagovetbehavior.com

  • John Ciribassi
    John Ciribassi
    Keymaster

    Amy

    This is a difficult topic, because of the very reasons you mentioned in your post. We do not want to discourage adoptions from shelters and rescues but the fact is that we are seeing more (in my opinion) animals being adopted out by well meaning groups who in the past would not have been when euthanasia of aggressive animals was more common place. I believe these adoptions occur for a few reasons. One is that the group truely may be unaware of a behavior issue with the animal, they may not be as forthcoming as needed in giving needed info to the potential adoptees or the behavior simply is not present or observed in the pet prior to adoption. We all know that temperament testing cannot reliabily ID all behavior issues. Finally, as we know, often serious behavior issues (especailly aggressive behaviors) may not become obvious until the period of social maturity.

    I think potential adoptees should consider a few principles when adopting:

    • observe the pet at the shelter with all family memnbers present (including, if allowed, other dogs in the household. Have them look for signs of shyness, unwillingness to interact or excessive hyperactive behavior.
    • ask the adopting group for all behavioral, medical and historical information that they have on the dog, including results of any temperament testing that might have been done.
    • input from kennel staff or fosters that may have spent time with the animal
    • verify, in writing, the return policy of the group
    • have them take the dog for a medical visit and enroll in either puppy/kitten class or age appropriate training classes soon after adoption.
    • ideally adopt from a group that offers training classes and assistance with behavior issues should they arise and see if they refer to veterinary behaviorists or CAABs in the area.

    Also, ACVB and AVSAB are considering developing a position statement on this very issue and hope that something will be available within the next year.

    Thanks for the great question.

    John

    John Ciribassi DVM, DACVB
    Chicagoland Veterinary Behavior Consultants
    Carol Stream, IL 60188
    drjdvm@gmail.com
    www.chicagovetbehavior.com

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 20 total)

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Carolyn Lincoln, DVM
AVSAB Corresponding Secretary
avsabe@gmail.com

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